My Grandma’s Fragrant Treasures (Part 3)

     What amazes me about the vintage perfumes that came from deep within my grandma’s closets last summer is that she doesn’t know how most of them got there. And that’s not even considering the liquid-turned-solid foundation we found there…

     1. Revlon Charlie White:

     Remember how surprised I was to find out that Revlon makes fragrances? And here I was thinking that the weird smell to their makeup was coincidental…

     My mom wore Charlie when she was younger but she doesn’t remember a Charlie White. On the front of the box it says “מתנה”, which translates to gift, or present.

     Whether that means this 15 mL frosted glass flacon was free with purchase or not remains unclear, but for now, let’s sniff.

     To me Charlie White smells like a gourmand white floral, which is just really unpleasant. It smells like old hospital bed sheets, which is gross and then some.

     I’m tossing this because it doesn’t seem to even be that old (1994). Can I just say, I really want to see a Charlie Brown flanker?

     2. Cacharel Anais Anais:

     Again, I don’t even think this is that old. The box is pretty, but seems rather faded. Interestingly enough, it was imported by a Canadian company, leading me to believe grandma bought this on her trip to Canada in the 80’s.

     The bottle would be a lot nicer if it had been porcelain instead of plastic, and if the labels were printed instead of stuck on.

     The scent is powdery, like sticking your head nose-first into a pot of setting powder. Up close there’s some sort of aquatic floral, but altogether it’s really bad. Sorry if you like this.

(Tossed before photographing, my apologies)

     3. Revlon Jontue:

     Another sample, and this one’s nearly empty.

     I have no info about this one besides the 1976 release date, and there’s hardly enough to smell at all. The notes pyramid seems interesting, though, with the chamomile note.

 

     That’s it for this time, we’ll see where the next post leads us! Until then, happy sniffing.

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