Sample Review: YESTERDAY HAZE by IMAGINARY AUTHORS

     You’ve probably thought to yourself at least once about writing a book. You hear a conversation while standing in line at Starbucks (waiting to order a pumpkin spice latte, no doubt) and all of a sudden you think, “Wow, that’d be a great scene!” Or perhaps you’ve gotten further than most and have given your literary masterpiece a title – and it’s a good one, too. But are you really a writer if all you do is fantasize, or are you just an imaginary one?

     Conveniently tying into today’s topic of review, have you heard of the niche perfume house of Imaginary Authors? Founded by Josh Meyer in 2012, the house’s scents are all unisex, and each tells an intricate and poetic story.

     Josh sent me samples for seven of the house’s eight fragrances, and I wanted to review three of them in a row, and write about the others when the current pre-posted train ends (mid January 2015). We’ll start today with the newest release, Yesterday Haze, and then work our way chronologically from 2012 to the present. So grab a blanket and some tea, curl up on your favourite couch, and get ready to go on a literary adventure!

Imaginary Authors Yesterday Haze sample

Imaginary Authors Yesterday Haze sample

     Yesterday Haze was released earlier in 2014, ‘written’ by Lenora Blumberg – one of Josh’s imaginary authors, who also penned 2012’s Violet Disguise. The story for Yesterday Haze goes like this:

Yesterday Haze, the subtly sinister follow-up to Lenora Blumberg’s acclaimed debut Violet Disguise, tells the story of a farmer’s wife who, after maintaining a decades-long affair with a crop duster pilot, decides to come clean to her husband, who also happens to be her lover’s employer. ‘Just as sunsets are more beautiful on hazy days,’ Blumberg wrote, ‘so, too, are the memories of yesterday.’ Set in California’s tranquil and dusty San Joaquin Valley, the elaborate tale unfolds like a dream, delicately shifting perceptions like the colors of a dimming dusk.

     When I first read this, all I could think was, “That’s something I’d want to read”. The sample I was provided with seemed to be about 2mL in volume, with a round gradient sticker on the front that almost looks like a stretched out football with its white ‘stitches’.

     Yesterday Haze opens with an accord of dry earth and hot fig fruit, like an orchard in the middle of summer, where the fruits have fallen to the ground and begin to fry in the sun. Quickly enough it takes on a creamy nuttiness that combines with the fig and a tiny hint of something floral to create a sort of floral tea blend aroma. In a sort of way it’s very reminiscent of a potpourri you would put out in autumn, but refined. The dry down is rather woodsy, where the fig takes a turn for the sweeter. You can almost imagine the farmer’s wife sharing a drink with the pilot, who is sweaty and dirty from the work, while they sit in her garden.

     Yesterday Haze is not traditional in any sense of the word. This sort of deep, dirty scent is hard to wear for every-day business, especially for a woman. And yet, there’s something attractive about its dustiness.

     Verdict: Yesterday Haze is a deep, ‘dirty’ perfume that would work much better on a man than a lady. It reminds me of the dryness I wrote about in my review for Vanille Insensee, but is far fruitier than that one was. I would recommend sampling extensively before purchasing, because I can see a significant other objecting to this. Approach with an open mind.

~ ~ ~

You can check out Imaginary Authors at www.ImaginaryAuthors.com or follow them on Twitter at twitter.com/IAParfumerie

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s